Author Archive for: webmaster

March 12, 2019
12 Mar 2019

Political Update – March 12, 2019

 

Two of the senators pushing PERS secrecy bill receive six-figure public pensions 

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

February 28, 2019

State Sens. David Parks and Joyce Woodhouse each receives a six-figure pension from the Public Employees’ Retirement System. Now, they’re co-sponsoring a bill to prevent you from finding out how much they and other retirees will collect going forward.

State law requires PERS to disclose retiree names, payouts and employment information such as years of service and last employer. You need these details to calculate the generosity of PERS payouts. This data is especially important because PERS says its unfunded liability is more than $13 billion. Using private-sector accounting, however, that number tops $40 billion. PERS is raising contribution rates this year to pay down that debt.

Sky-high payouts are a significant part of this problem. Rossi Ralenkotter, the disgraced former CEO of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, retired last year. He’s now collecting a $284,000-a-year pension for life. Based on his salary history, it looks like he took a reduced pension to provide for a beneficiary in the case of his death.

Former Clark County School District superintendent Pat Skorkowsky retired last year with 30 years of service. His yearly pension is $238,000.

Former Assistant Sheriff Todd Fasulo earned $190,000 in base pay in 2017. His pension is worth $168,000 a year, which was more than 88 percent of his final year’s base pay. After “retiring” from government after just 27 years of service, he started working as vice president of security at Wynn Las Vegas.

David Noahr earned $157,000 in base pay working for the North Las Vegas police department in 2017. His yearly pension is now $177,000 a year, which is 113 percent of his last full year of base pay. Thomas Carroll retired as a chief deputy district attorney in 2018. His base pay was $161,000 in 2017. He now rakes in a yearly pension of $156,000, equivalent to 97 percent of his final salary.

Pension data comes from PERS via a public records request. PERS provided February 2019 payouts; yearly pensions are extrapolated from that. Salary data is from TransparentNevada.com.

This analysis reveals the generosity of PERS benefits, but it’s impossible to do without retiree names. Yet three state senators don’t want you to see this information.

*NEW*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“Taxpayers, including PERS members themselves, serve as the ultimate backstop to the retirement system. They are the ones required to pay when there’s a shortfall, as they have been repeatedly over the last decade.”

Richard Karpel,
Executive Director of the Nevada Press Association,
to the Nevada Senate Committee on Government Affairs

Lawmakers again hear divisive proposal to keep public pension recipients’ names private

James DeHaven
Reno Gazette Journal

March 1, 2019

It could soon get a lot harder to find out who is receiving a public pension in Nevada.

A deeply divisive bill heard at the Legislature on Friday would make the names of retirees enrolled in the state-run Public Employees’ Retirement System confidential and exempt from public records requests.

Current state law requires PERS to disclose the type and amount of pension paid to retirees, as well as their name, last employer, years of service and years of retirement.  

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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March 6, 2019
06 Mar 2019

Political Update – March 5, 2019

 

Study: Nevada local government employees fare better than counterparts in 45 states 

Bethany Blankley
Watchdog.org

March 1, 2019

Local government workers in Nevada earn 46 percent more than their private sector counterparts, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the median earnings for local government workers in Nevada were higher than their government peers in 45 other states.

Statewide, government salaries and benefits cost taxpayers about $10 billion last year, the Nevada Public Policy Institute (NPRI) says – totaling 80 percent of all tax revenue collected by every state and local government agency in Nevada.

“If Nevada’s government pay gap continues its upward growth, the resulting tax hikes necessary to sustain such excess may become too great to bear,” Robert Fellner, director of Policy at NPRI, said.

There are different ways to interpret the data, Fellner explained, and not all comparisons are equivalent.

When considering education, experience and other factors, the salaries of local government employees and private sector employees are nearly equivalent, Fellner said. However, when considering total compensation, local government employees fare better than their private sector counterparts.

According to the Census Bureau’s 2017 earnings estimates for the median full-time, year-round worker, the disparity between government and private sector employees in Nevada is the largest in the U.S. By this measure it is nearly six times greater than the 8 percent median state differential nationwide.

The median earnings for local government workers in Nevada in 2017 were $58,644; the median for their private sector employee counterparts was $40,259.

Nevada state government employees’ median income of $51,948 was nearly 13 percent less than that of local government employees, Fellner points out.

“Study results have found that Nevada government workers [both local and state] can make as much as 57 percent more than a private-sector worker in the same jobs thanks to the massively richer health and retirement benefits government workers receive,” Fellner says.

*NEW*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“If Nevada’s government pay gap continues its upward growth, the resulting tax hikes necessary to sustain such excess may become too great to bear.”

Robert Fellner,

NPRI Policy Director,
Watchdog.org
Mar 1, 2019

COMMENTARY: Collective bargaining for state government workers would bust the budget

Andrew G. Biggs
Special to the Review-Journal

March 2, 2019

In the coming days, the Legislature will consider whether to allow Nevada’s state government employees to collectively bargain. Right on time, the union-affiliated Economic Policy Institute has produced research purporting to show that Nevada state workers are underpaid. But that research is incorrect.

Nevada’s state government employees receive salaries slightly below private-sector levels, but benefits that are massively more generous. For most state employees, total compensation almost surely exceeds what they would receive in private-sector jobs.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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February 26, 2019
26 Feb 2019

Political Update – February 26, 2019

 

The political push for state-worker
collective bargaining 

Robert Fellner
Nevada Policy Research Institute

February 2019

Nevada Worker Type Earnings as % of private-sector earnings Rank among the 50 states
State Govt 129% 4
Local Govt 146% 1

Extending the ability to collectively bargain to Nevada state government workers will increase state spending by approximately $500 million annually — a price that will be paid by taxpayers via higher taxes, decreased government services or both. 

The argument put forward to justify this staggering increase in future spending is based on a false belief that state workers are underpaid. 

This paper shows that, when measured on a variety of metrics, compensation for Nevada state government workers is already significantly above market levels. Median earnings for Nevada state workers are 29 percent above private earnings — a gap that is the fourth largest nationwide. 

Average compensation for Nevada state workers ranked 10th highest nationwide on a raw, unadjusted basis, and fifth highest when accounting for the different price levels among the 50 states. 

A state-by-state ranking that compared compensation for state government workers against their similarly skilled and educated private-sector counterparts found Nevada government workers earned 29 percent more than their private-sector peers — a premium that was the ninth largest nationwide.

Finally, Nevada state government workers themselves demonstrate that current compensation levels are more than adequate via a voluntary quit rate that is just a tiny fraction of the overall quit rate of workers nationwide. 

Taken together, this evidence makes clear that compensation for state government workers is already well above market levels, and the additional cost associated with extending collective bargaining to state workers is an unnecessary burden on taxpayers. 

In spite of this, Nevada lawmakers are poised to extend collective bargaining to state government workers. While the added cost for such a policy is clearly deleterious from a social welfare perspective, it makes tremendous sense from a political perspective — as the concentrated support bestowed upon compliant politicians from what will become essentially a taxpayer-funded political action committee far outweighs any dispersed costs that they will face from the average taxpayer. 

This corrosion of the democratic process is precisely why collective bargaining for government workers has historically been opposed by economists, pro-union lawmakers and even labor unions themselves. 

Giving state workers the ability to collectively bargain will further corrupt the political process in Nevada at the expense of taxpayers and citizens.

*NEW*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

This disparity is highlighted when government earnings are measured as a percentage of private-sector earnings.

At 29 percent more than private-sector median earnings, Nevada state workers had the 4th largest pay gap nationwide.

Mandatory collective bargaining for Nevada’s local government workers is performing exactly as intended. Median earnings for Nevada’s local government workers were 46 percent greater than private-sector earnings, a gap that was by far the largest nationwide.”

Robert Fellner,

NPRI Policy Director

By the numbers: Nevada ranks 8th best on property tax study

Nevada Watchdog

February 23, 2019

Nevada finished eighth in a new study by the Tax Foundation ranking which states have the most business-friendly property tax structures.

The state’s ranking remained unchanged from its 2018 score, according to the foundation’s analysis, which is part of a wider study titled “2019 State Business Tax Climate Index.”

All states and the District of Columbia have property tax systems. These taxes are a concern for businesses because often tax rates on commercial property exceed that of residential property, according to the Tax Foundation.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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February 19, 2019
19 Feb 2019

Political Update – February 19, 2019





Democrats want new taxes without a two-thirds vote 

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

 

February 5, 2019

Some Nevada Democrats aren’t satisfied with having a Democratic governor and large legislative majorities. They also want to ignore the state constitution to make it easier to raise taxes.

In the mid-1990s, Nevadans overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment mandating that tax increases receive two-thirds approval from each legislative body. Alternatively, a simple majority of legislators can seek voter approval for a tax hike.

“An affirmative vote of not fewer than two-thirds of the members elected to each House is necessary to pass a bill or joint resolution which creates, generates or increases any public revenue in any form,” Nevada’s constitution states.

That’s all-encompassing and unambiguous, which is a problem for Gov. Steve Sisolak.

His budget, despite his claims to the contrary, contains a tax increase. Under current law, the modified business tax rate will decrease in July. But Sisolak wants to maintain the current rate in order to help fund his record-setting spending spree. While Democrats have a supermajority in the Assembly, they are one vote short of two-thirds control in the Senate.

That leaves Democrats two constitutional choices. Either cut a deal with Senate Republicans to get a vote or increase spending by 10 percent instead of 11 percent.

Democrat leaders, however, are considering a third option: ignoring the constitution.

Senate Majority Leader Kelvin Atkinson said recently he doesn’t believe extending a tax rate requires a two-thirds vote. Sisolak has hinted that he agrees. Their argument is that because the rate stays the same, it’s “not a new tax,” in the words of Atkinson.

But that line of reasoning falls apart once you look at what the constitution actually says.

To extend a tax rate, the Legislature must pass a bill. That bill will increase revenues, which is exactly why Sisolak wants the tax rate extended. The constitution requires a bill that “increases any public revenues in any form” to pass with a two-thirds vote in each house or receive voter approval.

*NEW*

 

 

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

"Politicians are happy to promise above-market compensation to government unions, as they do so with other people’s money. Moreover, politicians are keenly aware of the outsized role these organizations play in the election process, essentially operating as tax-funded political action committees.”

 

Robert Fellner,

NPRI Policy Director

 

Collective bargaining for state workers is about politics, not fairness

Nevada Policy Research Institute

February 13, 2019

Granting collective bargaining powers to Nevada state workers will increase annual spending by an estimated $500 million annually, a cost that will be passed onto taxpayers through higher taxes, reduced services or both.

The arguments most commonly used in support of Senate Bill 135, which is scheduled for a hearing before the Senate Government Affairs Committee next Wednesday, is the false belief that state workers are underpaid.

Keystone's Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone's Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor's office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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February 12, 2019
12 Feb 2019

Political Update – February 12, 2019

Nevada Republicans say Sisolak tax renewal plan gives them leverage 

Bill Dentzer
Las Vegas Review-Journal

January 17, 2019

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak fleshed out his spending requests Thursday with the release of an $8.9 billion proposed budget that puts the cost of teacher raises, one of his signature proposals, at $180 million over two years.

While pledging no new taxes in his State of the State address Wednesday night, the Democrat is proposing retention of two taxes that were scheduled to be reduced or phased out at the end of fiscal year June 30. Keeping them would generate $138 million over the two-year budget period that will start July 1.

But Republican lawmakers said Thursday that such an extension is a new tax in everything but name and would require a two-thirds majority vote of the Legislature. Democrats hold that supermajority in the 42-seat Assembly but are one vote short of it in the 21-member Senate.

“When a tax expires and you renew it, I think the N-E-W part of that means it’s new,” said Assembly Minority Leader Jim Wheeler, R-Gardnerville. “Unless they can make some kind of deal with the Senate on that side, I believe it will fail.”

The state’s modified business tax was slated for a reduction June 30. Retaining it through June 2021 would generate $48 million a year. Similarly, Sisolak wants to keep a portion of the governmental services tax that was scheduled to sunset in June. The tax, paid by vehicle registration, is based on the vehicle’s value. Keeping the tax as is would generate an additional $21 million annually.

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“It’s a new tax. They’re reauthorizing a new tax. If it was not a new tax, we wouldn’t need to vote on it.”

Senate Minority Leader James Settelmeyer,
LVRJ, January 17, 2019

Even the Federal Reserve finds problems with PERS

Victor Joecks

Las Vegas Review-Journal

February 7, 2019

The Federal Reserve recently examined Nevada’s pension system. The results are sobering.

It found that Nevada’s Public Employees’ Retirement System had an unfunded liability of $43.3 billion in 2016. For context, Gov. Steve Sisolak’s proposed two-year general fund budget is $9 billion.

PERS’ funding ratio, which compares assets with liabilities, was only 45.5 percent in 2016. In 2008, PERS’ funding ratio bottomed out at 41.4 percent. That’s not good. It gets even worse.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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November 20, 2018
20 Nov 2018

Political Update – November 20, 2018

 

Nevada approves Google’s $600M data center near Las Vegas, $25.2M in tax incentives 

Jason Hidalgo
Reno Gazette-Journal

November 16, 2018

The state of Nevada approved an application by Google for a $600 million data center in Clark County.

The new data center will be located in Henderson, Nevada, and is projected to create 50 jobs within five years. The average wage for the data center is estimated to be $31.25 per hour.

As part of a tax abatement agreement worth $25.2 million, Google will run the data center and employ its workers while Design LLC — a wholly owned subsidiary by Google — will own the property. The project will receive a 2 percent sales and use tax abatement over 20 years worth $18.75 million and a 75 percent property tax abatement over 20 years worth nearly $6.5 million from the state.

The Google application was one of 10 that were approved by the state this week. Other approvals by the state include applications by lead refiner Aqua Metals in Storey County, manufacturer Berkley International and specialty refiner Redwood Material in Carson City, and bicycle company FOX Factory and software-as-a-service business rfXcel in Washoe County.

Quote of the week

 


Quote:

“Nevada is giving Google a $25 million subsidy which equals $504,000 per job created. Creating 50 jobs at Google within 5 years, costing more hiring than 500 new teachers for next school year.”

Keyston Corporation

Nevada government pay gap highest in the nation, new data shows

Robert Fellner

Nevada Policy Research Institute

October 31, 2018

When measured as a percentage of private-sector earnings, Nevada local government workers were by far the highest paid in the nation last year, according to newly released Census data.

Last month, the U.S. Census Bureau released 2017 earnings estimates for the median full-time, year-round worker.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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November 13, 2018
13 Nov 2018

Political Update – November 13, 2018

 

Sandoval, Reid leave contrasting legacies 

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

November 10, 2018

…Sandoval’s action differed sharply. Sandoval defeated incumbent Gov. Jim Gibbons in a primary by selling himself as a conservative. He said he would “stop job-killing tax increases” and that he opposed gay marriage and driver’s licenses for illegal aliens. None of that was true, and the party faithful noticed. Instead of rebuilding the Nevada Republican Party, he divided it. After the candidate he backed for chairman in 2013 lost, Sandoval disengaged.

Sandoval’s popularity scared off credible Democrat challengers in 2014, which helped Republicans legislators sweep to power. Reid would have capitalized on that opportunity to help Democrats for decades. But Sandoval split Republicans to pass the largest tax increase in Nevada history. The one groundbreaking reform from that session — Education Savings Accounts — is now all but dead after Sandoval let the 2017 session end without securing funding.

Quote of the week

 


Quote:

“I’ve committed, we’re not going to be raising taxes. That’s not my intent.”

Nevada Governor-Elect
Steve Sisolak

November 8, 2018

Sisolak: NV must spend more on mental health, but not raise taxes

Hugh Jackson

Nevada Current

November 8, 2018

In an interview with KNPR’s State of Nevada Thursday, Governor-elect Steve Sisolak said he has no intention of raising taxes.

“I’ve committed, we’re not going to be raising taxes. That’s not my intent.”

Instead Sisolak says the state “can do a lot with reallocation” of state revenue streams.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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November 5, 2018
05 Nov 2018

Political Update – November 5, 2018

 

‘Steve Sisolak Cannot Be Trusted’ 

A Letter From Fmr. Democrat County Commissioner Tom Collins to Fmr. Governor Bob List

October 31, 2018

Friend,

I’m a Democrat. I was elected to serve on the Clark County Commission as a Democrat, and so was Steve Sisolak. I will never vote for Steve Sisolak. I think he is a crook.

Adam and I don’t agree on every little political issue, but I trust him. I know he’s a good man. I know he cares about the people of Nevada, and he’ll always put them first. And I know, without a doubt, his opponent Steve Sisolak only cares about himself.

I worked with Steve. I saw him in action. His top priorities were always himself, his wallet, and his donors. If you want to keep Nevada from going completely crooked, vote against Steve Sisolak.

I know there are a lot of Democrats out there like myself—people who care about the little guy and want to see our government get things done. You might feel like you have to vote for the guy with the “D” by his name. I’m proud to be a Democrat, and I’m telling you right now: this election is about more than politics. It’s about character. Steve Sisolak does not have the character to be governor.

A vote for Steve Sisolak isn’t a vote to stand up to Donald Trump or any of the other nonsense he’s using to trick people. It’s a vote to stroke his ego and fill his pockets with more cash, plain and simple.

Adam is a common-sense guy. He wants to fix our schools, keep our economy rolling, and keep people safe. Steve Sisolak only looks out for himself, and I promise if you vote for him he will make you regret it.

I’m a Democrat, I worked with Sisolak, and I voted for Adam Laxalt. If you’re a Democrat, Republican, Independent, or anything else: we need you to vote, and we need you to vote for Adam Laxalt. This election is too important. Steve Sisolak cannot be trusted.

For Nevada,

Tom Collins
Former Democratic Clark County Commissioner

Quote of the week

 


Quote:

“Sisolak’s top priorities were always himself, his wallet, and his donors. If you want to keep Nevada from going completely crooked, vote against Steve Sisolak.”

Tom Collins

October 31, 2018

Nevada’s Government Pay Gap Highest in Nation, new data says

Robert Fellner

Nevada Research Institute

October 31, 2018

When measured as a percentage of private-sector earnings, Nevada local government workers were by far the highest paid in the nation last year, according to newly released Census data.

Last month, the U.S. Census Bureau released 2017 earnings estimates for the median full-time, year-round worker.

At $58,644, the median earnings for local government workers in Nevada were 46 percent greater than the $40,259 received by Nevada’s private-sector workers — a disparity that was by far the largest nationwide and nearly six times greater than the eight percent differential found at the median state nationwide.

 

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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October 30, 2018
30 Oct 2018

Political Update – October 30, 2018

 

Republican Candidates’ Lead Grow in Key Nevada Races

Bethany Blankley

Nevada Watchdog
October 26, 2018

Despite talk of a potential blue wave in the upcoming midterm elections, Republican candidates are surging in several key Nevada races, according to a recent poll.

In the Nevada governor’s race, education and tax policy are among the top issues.

“Education has emerged, once again, as the most important issue in the race to be Nevada’s governor,” the Las Vegas Review-Journal wrote.

Both gubernatorial candidates have proposed plans for education reform, though both are not receiving the same reception by voters.

Republican Adam Laxalt proposed two detailed education reform plans. One would promote career and technical training for educators; the other would create a fund to reward well-performing schools. He also pledged to increase education spending by $500 million.

His Democratic challenger and Chairman of the Clark County Commission, Steve Sisolik, unveiled a nine-point plan for improving the state’s K-12 system. He proposed modernizing the state’s education funding formula for public schools, increasing the amount public schools receive from marijuana sales tax revenue, and increasing taxes overall. Sisolak has not specified the amount by which he would increase education funding, only that he “will work to increase funding.”

“Everything is on the table except for one thing, and that’s doing nothing and the status quo, because it’s not working,” Sisolak said.

In a scathing editorial, Review-Journal editors wrote that Sisolak “doesn’t even have the basics down” on education and that his “plan is to come up with one after he’s elected.” His education plan, they say, “reads like an effort to pander to everyone in the state instead of laying out a vision that voters can evaluate – and potentially reject.”

While Laxalt’s plans are detailed, the newspaper suggests, “before Sisolak talks any more about improving Nevada education, he needs to educate himself.”

When it comes to taxes, Laxalt’s campaign told Watchdog.org that he is committed to not raising taxes.

Several television ads critical of Sisolak and paid for by the Republican Governor’s Association (RGA) point to Sisolak’s “long record of supporting new taxes and fees on Nevada families.”

“Sisolak has claimed that ‘everything is on the table’ when it comes to tax hikes on Nevada families, but misused taxpayer funds to help his ex-girlfriend,” RGA Communications Director Jon Thompson said in a statement accompanying the ad. “Nevada taxpayers can’t count on Steve Sisolak to be honest.”

In a recent interview with KTVN-TV, Sisolak claimed that he doesn’t see any need to raise taxes to fund his proposals if elected. But he also said a few months ago, critics point out, that “one of the ways that we are going to have to pay for [my policies], and people don’t want to hear it, is property taxes.”

A poll released this week by Emerson College shows Laxalt leading Sisolak by five points, above the survey’s 4.2 percent margin of error.

Voters also are favoring Republican U.S. Sen. Dean Heller, according to the Emerson College poll. Heller leads his Democratic challenger, Rep. Jacky Rosen, by seven points – 48 to 41 percent, also above the margin of error.

Previous polls conducted by the New York Times and NBC News put Heller ahead by two points; Real Clear Politics’ polling average has Heller beating Rosen by 1.7 points.

 

READ MORE HERE

Quote of the week

 


Quote:

“(Sisolak) Doesn’t even have the basics down on education and…his ‘plan is to come up with one after he’s elected.’ His education plan, they say, ‘reads like an effort to pander to everyone in the state instead of laying out a vision that voters can evaluate – and potentially reject.'”

Article,

Watchdog Nevada

October 26, 2018

Laxalt Is The Clear Choice for Governor

Las Vegas Review Journal
October 12, 2018

The Review-Journal enthusiastically endorses Attorney General Adam Laxalt to serve as Nevada’s next governor.

Here’s why:

Under the administration of Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval, Nevada has emerged from the depths of the Great Recession. Unemployment — which hit 13.7 percent 2010 — is now near all-time lows. Robust job growth and a revitalized housing market are in stark contrast to the dire conditions that existed less than a decade ago. Meanwhile, sales and gaming tax collections — which constitute more than half the state’s general fund — are again at healthy levels and growing.

Term limits prevent Gov. Sandoval seeking re-election this year. And as the November election approaches, Nevada voters have a clear choice. Do they prefer a candidate who will continue to pursue an agenda of growth, opportunity and prosperity through policies that encourage scholarship, entrepreneurship and innovation, or would they rather support a candidate likely to raise taxes, preserve the status quo when it comes to public schools and oversee an expansion of Nevada’s regulatory state?

Those who favor the former will support Mr. Laxalt over Democrat Steve Sisolak, particularly given the likely makeup of the state Legislature.

Mr. Laxalt, 40, has built an impressive resume. After graduating from Georgetown Law in 2005, he served in the U.S. Navy’s Judge Advocate General Corps for five years, earning the rank of lieutenant. He followed that up with a four-year stint at a Reno law firm before being elected in 2014 as Nevada’s attorney general.

Mr. Laxalt, the grandson of Paul Laxalt, who served one term as Nevada governor before representing the state for 13 years in the U.S. Senate…

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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October 23, 2018
23 Oct 2018

Political Update – October 23, 2018

 

Adam Laxalt Is The Clear Choice for Governor

Las Vegas Review Journal
October 12, 2018

The Review-Journal enthusiastically endorses Attorney General Adam Laxalt to serve as Nevada’s next governor.

Here’s why:

Under the administration of Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval, Nevada has emerged from the depths of the Great Recession. Unemployment — which hit 13.7 percent 2010 — is now near all-time lows. Robust job growth and a revitalized housing market are in stark contrast to the dire conditions that existed less than a decade ago. Meanwhile, sales and gaming tax collections — which constitute more than half the state’s general fund — are again at healthy levels and growing.

Term limits prevent Gov. Sandoval seeking re-election this year. And as the November election approaches, Nevada voters have a clear choice. Do they prefer a candidate who will continue to pursue an agenda of growth, opportunity and prosperity through policies that encourage scholarship, entrepreneurship and innovation, or would they rather support a candidate likely to raise taxes, preserve the status quo when it comes to public schools and oversee an expansion of Nevada’s regulatory state?

 

READ MORE HERE

Quote of the week

 


Quote:

“High on Mr. Laxalt’s list is preserving the state’s reputation as a low-tax state while promoting policies that will attract jobs and new private investment to Nevada.”

Las Vegas Review Journal

October 12, 2018

Laxalt Talks About His Healthcare and Economic Development

Victor Joekes

Las Vegas Review Journal
October 18, 2018

Nevada should institute Medicaid work requirements for healthy adults and encourage doctors to come and remain in Nevada, according to Republican gubernatorial candidate and attorney general Adam Laxalt. He also thinks Nevada should focus its economic development efforts on removing barriers to entry, instead of providing tax breaks to select companies.

“While I’ve pledged that I’m not going to rollback the Medicaid expansion, we need to make sure that Medicaid is preserved for the people that most need it,” Laxalt said while filming Nevada Politics Today. Medicaid “was created for people who can’t work, people we all agree deserve a safety net. I certainly would sign Nevada up for the work requirement.”

Laxalt said a work requirement would help people experience the “dignity of work.” He proposed following the example of Kentucky and other states that have received waivers from the federal government to implement work requirements.
While Steve Sisolak, Laxalt’s opponent, wants to convene a group to come up with health care recommendations, Laxalt said he’s already done that.

“I have put together a group of professionals,” he said. “We’ve been looking at that for many months. That’s reflected in my policy. We’ve already identified the major issues.

 

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

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