Archive for category: Political Update

January 21, 2020
21 Jan 2020

Political Update – January 21, 2020

EDITORIAL: What will taxpayers get for their $1.4 billion?

Las Vegas Review-Journal
January 18, 2020

Go big or go home, as they say. John Vellardita clearly didn’t want to go home.

Mr. Vellardita, who runs the Clark County Education Association, finally revealed last week the details of his long-simmering plan to transfer billions of dollars from taxpayers to his labor organization. The breadth of the money grab is impressive.

First, the union seeks to raise taxes by $300 million each year on the state’s largest gaming companies, which already supply nearly 40 percent of the Nevada’s general fund budget. (Full disclosure: The Review-Journal’s ownership also owns Strip casinos. But this paper has a well-documented, decades-long track record of skepticism when it comes to large tax hikes.) Mr. Vellardita seeks to qualify the gaming tax hike for the ballot, either forcing lawmakers to act in 2021 or putting the question before voters in 2022.

And like any good pitchman, Mr. Vellardita wasn’t finished. Wait, there’s more.

Next, the union unveiled a similar plan for the sales tax. Mr. Vellardita seeks to boost the levy by 1.5 percentage points and direct the money toward statewide education spending. Once again, the strategy is to qualify the proposal as an initiative, either forcing the Legislature to enact the tax hike next year or allowing Nevada voters to pass judgment in 2022. If enacted, this measure would jack the pot by a projected $1.1 billion annually while saddling Clark County residents with one of the country’s highest sales tax rates.The combined effect of these tax hikes would be to separate taxpayers from their money to the tune of $1.4 billion each year. To put that in perspective, the state’s entire general fund revenue stream didn’t hit $1.4 billion until the late 1990s. Let’s also not forget that this comes less than five years after lawmakers imposed the largest tax hike in state history to boost public school funding.

“This vote,” then-Gov. Brian Sandoval said in 2015 after the Legislature passed the $1.4 billion tax package, “moves us one step closer to cementing the legacy of public education by both raising accountability as well as increasing investment in order to suit the needs of generations to come.”

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“The union is pushing a liberal idea — that Nevada needs to throw money into a broken education system — but its overreach may end up helping conservative candidates.”

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

VICTOR JOECKS: CCEA’s tax initiatives a slap in the face to Sisolak

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

January 16, 2020

The Clark County Education Association no longer trusts Gov. Steve Sisolak to deliver on his education promises. That’s just one of the interesting takeaways from the two tax hike initiatives that the union proposed this week.

On Monday, the union filed an initiative to increase the gaming tax from 6.75 percent to 9.75 percent on gross monthly revenue over $250,000. It’s estimated this would raise more than $300 million a year.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

January 14, 2020
14 Jan 2020

Political Update – January 14, 2020

The Economy’s Inequality Dividend

The Editorial Board
Wall Street Journal

January 10, 2020

The December employment report on Friday was a modest disappointment with fewer new jobs and slowing wage gains. But the report is an exception to other strong recent labor data, and the big picture is that the longest hiring expansion in 80 years is lifting lower-income workers in particular as accumulating evidence shows.

The jobless rate remained steady at 3.5% as labor participation held at its recent high of 63.2%. The 145,000 new jobs are fewer than the 184,000 average monthly gains over the last three months and the 165,000 average over the past year. Most of the slowdown appears to be trade-related and reflects lower business investment.

Wage growth for production-level workers slowed with average hourly wages up 3% over the last year compared to 3.4% in November. Some of this may be monthly statistical noise, and the trend in the last two years has been higher wage growth among lower earners. That’s a contrast to the early years of this expansion when real wages were flat.

The Federal Reserve’s interventions inflated asset values, which helped the affluent but did little for low- and middle-income Americans who don’t own stocks. Enter Donald Trump, whose deregulation and tax reform unleashed a surge of business investment (before his tariff spree) and hiring, which has drawn workers off the sidelines and raised wages.

The comparative data are striking, and mostly ignored by the press. During the first 11 quarters of the Trump Presidency, wages for the bottom 10% of earners over age 25 rose an average 5.9% annually compared to 2.4% during Barack Obama’s second term, according to the latest demographic data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wages for the middle two quartiles increased 3.2% compared to 2.2% and 2.7% between 2012 and 2016. Wage gains for the top 10% have held steady at about 3%.

Less educated workers have also seen the strongest gains. Wages have risen at a 6.1% annual clip for workers over 25 without a high school degree and 3.9% for those with some college—both about three times faster than during the second Obama term. Wage gains have also accelerated though to a lesser degree—to 3.2% from 2.2%—for college grads.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“Irony alert: Socialism-loving young people are getting the biggest pay raises. Wages have increased on average 5.8% annually for teens, 4.4% for 20 to 24-year-olds and 4.8% for 25 to 34-year-olds during the Trump Presidency. Maybe as their incomes rise, more millennials will question the tale of woe and revolution that Bernie Sanders is selling them.”

The Editorial Board
Wall Street Journal

Group to collect signatures for Nevada redistricting initiative

Geoff Dornan
Nevada Appeal

January 10, 2020

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment that would turn reapportionment over to a commission instead of the Legislature on Tuesday filed an amended petition with the Secretary of State.

The amendment would turn redistricting over to a seven-member panel consisting of four appointees — one each by the majority and minority leaders of the Senate and Assembly plus three “independent” members. The three would be chosen by the four party appointees and could not be either Republican or Democrat.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

January 7, 2020
07 Jan 2020

Political Update – January 7, 2020

Legislators vote to appeal Carson City judge’s ruling in state tax lawsuit

Geoff Dornan
Nevada Appeal

December 30, 2019

On a party line vote, the Legislative Commission voted Monday to appeal the ruling disqualifying legislative lawyers from representing Democrats in the lawsuit over the constitutionality of two tax bills.

Carson District Judge Todd Russell in November disqualified LCB from representing the majority Democrats in the Senate but allowed the legal division to stay in the case to represent the interests of the Legislature as a whole.

Republicans headed by Minority Leader James Settelmeyer, R-Gardnerville, argued and Russell agreed that LCB can’t represent one group of lawmakers against another group of lawmakers because the legal division represents the entire Legislature.

“It appears to this court there is a need for LCB to maintain neutrality with respect to all members of the Legislature,” Russell said in the November hearing.

He told both sides the individual lawmakers should either be dismissed from the lawsuit or they need to get private counsel.

His ruling, if it stands, would require Majority Leader Nicole Cannizzaro of Las Vegas, Lt. Gov. Kate Marshall and Senate Secretary Claire Clift to get their own lawyers while LCB would represent only the interests of the Legislature as a whole.

Chief litigation counsel Kevin Powers told the commission Monday the ruling must be appealed because it would apply not just to litigation but all legal services. He said the ruling raises “serious questions” whether LCB legal would even be able to provide bill drafting if one group of lawmakers opposes the requested bill.

Powers said the appeal is needed to protect the integrity of LCB legal. He asked for a vote to direct LCB to take all actions necessary to overturn the disqualification.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“Ironically, there is enough extra money in the state treasury to cover the $100 million if the Republicans win the lawsuit.”

Geoff Dornan
Nevada Appeal

Government tried to compete with Uber. It got crushed.

Las Vegas Review-Journal
January 2, 2020

Government should avoid competing with private industry. Some people have to learn the hard way.

In June, the Regional Transportation Committee of Southern Nevada announced with much fanfare that it was taking on ride-hailing services, such as Uber and Lyft. The RTC unveiled its Trip to Strip program, which used 12- and 11-passenger vans to move people from the airport to the Strip, the Las Vegas Convention Center and outlying resorts. Just like private-sector ride-hailing services, customers called the vans using a smartphone app.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

December 31, 2019
31 Dec 2019

Political Update – December 31, 2019

Teachers Pay High Fees for Retirement Funds. Unions Are Partly to Blame.

Anne Tergesen and Gretchen Morgenson
The Wall Street Journal

December 18, 2019

The pitch from the president of the Indian River County teachers union couldn’t have been clearer.

Liz Cannon, who heads the Indian River chapter of the Florida Education Association, urged union members to buy retirement investments from Valic Financial Advisors Inc. through a firm owned by the union. That way “we also make money,” she said in a November 2017 newsletter, through regular dividends.

What Ms. Cannon didn’t mention was that investments from Valic, a unit of giant insurance company American International Group Inc., can carry high costs that may translate to a smaller nest egg when teachers retire.

The setup is one of an array of similar deals in which unions and other groups get income from endorsements of investment products and services—often at the expense of teachers and other municipal employees.

The ties help explain why many local-government workers continue to pay relatively high retirement-plan costs, while fees in corporate-based retirement plans are often lower and have been falling for years.

At issue are 403(b) retirement savings plans for teachers and 457 plans for government workers—variations on the 401(k) plans many companies offer. About $900 billion was held in 403(b) plans for public-school teachers and 457 plans at the end of June, according to the Investment Company Institute, a mutual-fund industry trade group.

In the crowded market, an endorsement from a union or municipal organization or affiliate can help an investment-product provider stand out. It also can give the provider’s sales agents access to union meetings, teachers’ lounges, benefit-enrollment fairs and professional conferences to pitch retirement and other products.

Valic’s Portfolio Director, an annuity that is popular in teachers’ retirement plans, charges fees of up to 2.3% of assets annually.

Fees average less than 1% in 401(k) accounts, according to research firm BrightScope Inc. and the ICI. The fees 401(k) participants pay for mutual funds that invest in stocks fell to 0.45% in 2017, on average, from 0.77% in 2000, ICI and BrightScope data show.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“The unions should be advocating on behalf of members, not selling products to them. They are there to protect teachers’ rights, not exploit them.”

Scott Dauenhauer, a registered investment adviser in Murrieta, Calif., who specializes in financial planning for teachers quoted by The Wall Street Journal

Taxpayers shouldn’t foot the bill for political union activity, says NPRI director

Daniel Honchariw
Reno Gazette-Journal

December 9, 2019

Should taxpayers be required to subsidize the activities — including the political activities — of private labor organizations like the Service Employees International Union?

Unsuspecting Nevadans may be surprised to learn their hard-earned money is being taxed to do just that — advance the interests of government unions, including the SEIU among others, who continuously lobby for more public spending, higher tax burdens and larger government.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

December 24, 2019
24 Dec 2019

Political Update – December 24, 2019

EDITORIAL: California town paying police more in pensions than salary

Las Vegas Review-Journal
December 8, 2019

To understand why public pension reform is urgent, look at California.

Despite a record stock market, CalPERS—the California government pension system — is only 71 percent funded. To make up the gap, it has been raising contribution rates across the state. Unlike in Nevada, where all participating governments pay the same rate, contribution rates vary in California. The amount some cities are paying is astronomical.

Rohnert Park is a small town 40 miles north of San Francisco. This year, contribution rates for its first- tier plan for police and fire employees are 110.9 percent of pay. That means for every dollar in salary, it’s contributing almost $1.11 to CalPERS. Next year, the rate will jump to 118.9 percent.

Last year, 15 public safety plans cost 70 percent or more of employee pay. This year, the number increased to 24. Next year, it’ll be 50, according to Ed Mendel at Calpensions.com.

A study from the League of California Cities found that pension contributions accounted for 8.3 percent of city spending in 2007. Last year, it was 11.2 percent, and by 2025, it’ll be 15.8 percent. Every dollar a government spends on pension contributions is one less dollar it has to spend on roads, parks or public safety.

Government agencies are already struggling to keep up.

“It is difficult to assess just how much strain current contribution levels are putting on employers,” CalPERS wrote in a report last month. “However, evidence such as collections activities, requests for extensions to amortization schedules and information regarding termination procedures indicate that some public agencies are under significant strain.”

Every government agency in California should be thanking President Donald Trump for overseeing a record-breaking economy. If the stock market weren’t soaring, contribution rates would be even higher.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“In the last decade, contribution rates to the Public Employees’ Retirement System of Nevada for regular employees have increased more than 40 percent. Despite those increases, PERS is only about 75 percent funded. The upcoming problems this will create are perfectly predictable, but Nevada’s leaders have shown little interest in addressing them.”

Las Vegas Review-Journal

EDITORIAL: Democrat plans would cripple economic growth

Las Vegas Review-Journal
December 12, 2019

Economic growth is more than an abstraction. An expanding economy is a healthy economy, one that increases living standards, provides robust employment opportunities and strengthens the public fisc. This week, the U.S. Department of Labor released statistics revealing that the Trump administration is doing a pretty good job in this regard.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

December 10, 2019
10 Dec 2019

Political Update – December 10, 2019

EDITORIAL: Fealty to state constitution — when it’s convenient

Las Vegas Review-Journal
December 3, 2019

Last month, state officials announced that Assemblywoman Heidi Swank, a Las Vegas Democrat, would leave the Legislature to become the first administrator of Nevada’s new Division of Outdoor Recreation, created by lawmakers in 2019 to promote economic growth through activities such as camping, hunting, boating, hiking and the like.

“Nevada has so many amazing outdoor opportunities and a variety of agencies and organizations doing work in this arena,” Ms. Swank said upon accepting the offer. “I look forward to bringing all these entities together to further Nevada’s outdoor recreation economy and get more Nevadans outdoors.”

But Ms. Swank’s tenure in the position — which paid up to $96,000 a year, not including benefits — ended before it began. Seems someone forgot that Article 4, Section 8 of the state constitution prohibits lawmakers from sliding into “any civil office of profit under this state which shall have been created” during their term in Carson City. Days after the announcement, a legislative lawyer informed Ms. Swank that her appointment was probably illegal. She stepped aside.

“I can’t blame anyone in this,” she told The Nevada Independent. “It was a bit of bad luck.”

We’ll leave for another day whether Nevada needs a new bureaucracy to appease conservationists and other outdoor special-interest groups. The purpose of the Article 4 constitutional prohibition is sound and intended to prevent lawmakers from creating cushy taxpayer-funded sinecures for their own benefit. But while attorneys at the Legislative Counsel Bureau are rediscovering obscure passages of the constitution, did they perchance stumble upon Article 3, Section 1 of that very same document?

“The powers of the government of the state of Nevada shall be divided into three separate departments, the legislative, the executive and the judicial,” it reads in plain English, “and no persons charged with the exercise of powers properly belonging to one of these departments shall exercise any functions appertaining to either of the others.”

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“[Article 3, Section 1 of the state constitution] is intended to guard against the dangers of consolidated power by preventing persons from simultaneously serving in two branches of government at the same time. Yet it has been entirely ignored for decades in Carson City, where — despite state attorney general opinions raising questions about the practice — public employees have routinely served in the Legislature with impunity as the courts and legislative attorneys look the other way.”

Las Vegas Review-Journal

Clark County teachers hit with $1,000 pay cut, thanks to pair of recent rate hikes

Robert Fellner
Nevada Policy Research Institute

December 3, 2019

Just months after threatening an illegal strike to obtain a modest salary raise, members of the Clark County teachers union (CCEA) are going to have to give a big chunk of that back, thanks to a pair of recent rate hikes that will cost the average teacher nearly $1,000 a year.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

December 3, 2019
03 Dec 2019

Political Update – December 3, 2019

EDITORIAL: Let employees decide if they want to work under a union contract or not

Las Vegas Review-Journal
November 30, 2019

Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that it’s unconstitutional to force government employees to pay union dues if they choose not to belong to a labor group. Now Congress needs to give nonunion employees in unionized workplaces the ability to negotiate their own contracts.

Last month, three Republican House members introduced the Worker’s Choice Act. It would allow workers in union shops to negotiate with their employers. That doesn’t sound significant — after all, it’s the norm in many work environments. In workplaces with union contracts, however, this would be a revolutionary innovation.

Under current law, unions negotiate a contract that covers all employees in a bargaining unit, including nonunion members. Even if you don’t join the union, you are subject to the conditions outlined in the union contract. Some nonunion members must also pay “agency fees,” which is the percentage of union dues that support contract negotiations. Agency fees are usually around 85 percent of full dues.

Nonunion employees in right-to-work states such as Nevada don’t have to pay agency fees. This is why unions are bitterly opposed to right-to-work laws. It dramatically undercuts their financial and political clout when they can’t extract payment from those who choose not to join.

Last year, the Supreme Court made all public employees right-to-work. In Janus v. AFSCME, the justices held that the mandatory collection of agency fees violated the free speech rights of nonmembers. In states without a right-to-work law, employees in private unions are still required to either pay agency fees or join the union.

Big Labor argues that agency fees are necessary to avoid “the ‘free rider’ incentive that would arise if nonmember employees could avoid paying dues while nevertheless retaining the benefits of representation by “an informed and expert negotiator,” as AFSCME argued in its Supreme Court brief.

But if unions are so concerned about “free riders,” they would be thrilled with the Worker’s Choice Act. Instead, they’re terrified of it.

The term “free rider” is a misnomer because the law grants unions a monopoly on collective bargaining. That means nonunion workers are prohibited from negotiating their own deals in union settings. This is the equivalent of a lawn care service cutting your grass every week without your permission. The company might complain that you don’t pay them. You’d correctly counter by pointing out that you never asked to receive their services.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“Imagine the union succeeds in increasing education spending by $1 billion a year. After four or six years, members of the education establishment will come to voters again and insist that this time — really — more money will fix our schools. Don’t let them keep fooling you.”

Victor Joecks

VICTOR JOECKS: CCEA promises that this time — really — more money will improve education

Victor Joecks
Las Vegas Review-Journal

November 23, 2019

The Clark County Education Association’s plan to pass the biggest tax increase in Nevada history depends on public ignorance. That strategy has worked before.

Last week, union officials announced they will seek to qualify a ballot measure to raise taxes by $1 billion a year and direct the proceeds toward public education. The union could use the ballot measure to pressure the 2021 Legislature to raise taxes before the initiative went to voters in 2022. For perspective, the largest tax increase in state history to this date brought in around $750 million a year.

This new funding, the union contends, is the key to improving Nevada’s schools. If only someone had tried this approach before. Oh, wait. Nevada did — four years ago. And 16 years ago. And in the late 1980s. And for most of the past 60 years.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

November 26, 2019
26 Nov 2019

Political Update – November 26, 2019

Democrats need outside lawyer in tax fight, judge rules

Bill Dentzer
Las Vegas Review-Journal

November 20, 2019

CARSON CITY — Elected state Democrats can’t be represented by the Legislature’s own lawyers in a lawsuit Republican senators filed to challenge the legality of two tax bills passed last session, a state judge has ruled.

The ruling means state Democrats named as defendants, including Senate Majority Leader Nicole Cannizzaro; Lt. Gov. Kate Marshall, as Senate president; and Gov. Steve Sisolak will need to be represented by outside counsel in the case, though fees will be paid by the state. The judge set April 1 for a hearing.

The dispute involves the Legislature’s votes last session to kill a scheduled decrease in the state’s modified business tax and keep a $1 technology fee on DMV transactions. Under a voter referendum approved in the mid-1990s, any bill that raises revenue from taxes in Nevada requires a two-thirds majority in both houses of the Legislature to pass.

The two bills in question met that threshold for passage in the Assembly but were one vote short of it in the Senate, where Democrats hold a 13-8 advantage. The bills passed the Senate by that margin and on party lines.

The business tax was scheduled to decrease with the start of the current fiscal year in July. Keeping it directs approximately $100 million in revenue to pay for education-related initiatives that were Democratic legislative priorities for the session.

Over Republican objections, Democrats pushed the bills through on the basis of a legal opinion from the nonpartisan Legislative Counsel Bureau. The bureau’s lawyers wrote that the two-thirds majority requirement did not apply when a tax is being extended at its existing rate. The eight Republican senators filed a lawsuit in July.

In Tuesday’s hearing, Carson City District Judge James Todd Russell sided with a GOP motion in the case to have the Counsel Bureau’s lawyers barred from representing the Democrats in the partisan dispute.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“It appears to this court that there’s a need for LCB to maintain its neutrality as to representation of all individual members of the Legislature. I just don’t think you can pick sides by representing individual senators against other senators.”

Carson City District Judge James Todd Russell

Clark County teachers union to push tax increase ballot initiatives

Amelia Pak-Harvey
Las Vegas Review-Journal

November 19, 2019

The Clark County teachers union is increasing member dues to fund a multi-million dollar campaign that would ask voters to approve a tax increase to provide at least $1 billion more annually for public education in Nevada.

The campaign aims to create two companion initiative petitions to raise taxes, although the Clark County Education Association has not yet settled on which taxes it would seek to increase. Initiative petitions require signatures of 10 percent of the voters who participated in the last general election in order to enact a ballot measure.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

November 19, 2019
19 Nov 2019

Political Update – November 19, 2019

Join Keystone Corporation

The Keystone Dinner last month featuring Trey Gowdy was a tremendous success. We encourage all those who attended and those that were unable to, to join Keystone Nevada. With each new member our voice grows stronger to find and support candidates that will work for a regulatory and tax environment favorable to business growth and development.   

The 2020 election is just around the corner. The future of our state and nation will be at stake, possibly as never before. In Nevada, our goal is to return the Legislature to those who would achieve and protect our goals. Keystone serves as an institution to promote and institute that mission. We must work together to accomplish these goals.  

Please click below and join with us as we continue to participate in the great debate.

John Gibson
Chairman & President of the Board

Quote of
the week


Quote:

“Nevada’s public pension system faces two certainties. PERS will need more funding and that money will come from state taxpayers.”

Las Vegas Review-Journal

EDITORIAL: Nevada PERS overwhelmingly funded by government contributions

Las Vegas Review-Journal
November 11, 2019

The Nevada Public Employees’ Retirement System relies more on government contributions than any state but Utah, according to data from the Census Bureau’s 2018 Annual Survey of Public Pensions.

The numbers reveal some sobering realities for Nevada taxpayers.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser

November 12, 2019
12 Nov 2019

Political Update – November 12, 2019

Nevada Republican business tax lawsuit on hold

Geoff Dornan
Nevada Appeal

November 11, 2019

CARSON CITY, Nev. — The Republican lawsuit seeking to rule two tax bills passed by a simple majority unconstitutional is on hold until a judge decides whether LCB Legal can effectively represent the Democrats.

That issue will be argued before Carson District Judge Todd Russell November 19.

Until that question is resolved, both sides have agreed to stay further action in the case.

In the lawsuit filed in July, all eight Republican Senators charge that Democrats violated the Nevada Constitution by passing bills delaying a sunset that would reduce the Modified Business Tax and a similar sunset on the technology fee DMV is using to pay for a new computer system.

While the DMV fee is relatively small, keeping the higher MBT rate will generate generate more than $100 million Democrats and the governor dedicated to K-12 Education.

Article 4 of the Nevada Constitution says a two-thirds vote is required, “to pass any bill or joint resolution which creates, generates or increases any public revenue.”

SB551 and SB542 were passed 13-8 in the Senate, one short of that mark.

But progress toward a hearing on the issue came to a halt after Legislative Counsel Brenda Erdoes filed documents September 16 that the Republicans argue makes LCB the counsel for Senate Democrats.

That prompted an October 24 motion by the Republican plaintiffs to disqualify LCB Legal as counsel for Senate Democrats.

Republicans led by Minority Leader James Settelmeyer of Gardnerville argue LCB can’t represent one group of lawmakers against another.

“It is a violation of an attorney’s ethical duty to represent a client if a conflict of interest exists,” the motion to disqualify states. “LCB is statutorily required to represent the Legislature as a whole and members of the Legislature cannot represent one member of that legislative body against another in an adversarial action. LCB’s representation of defendants Cannizzaro and Clift is directly adverse to the Plaintiff senators in this action.”

They argue LCB Legal must be disqualified as counsel for the legislative defendants, “because a concurrent conflict of interest exists in violation of the Nevada Rules of Professional Conduct.”

LCB Chief Litigation Counsel Kevin Powers on November 6 officially filed a brief arguing that LCB has the absolute right to intervene on behalf of the Legislature.

*IMPORTANT*

Quote of
the week

 


Quote:

“It is a violation of an attorney’s ethical duty to represent a client if a conflict of interest exists. LCB is statutorily required to represent the Legislature as a whole and members of the Legislature cannot represent one member of that legislative body against another in an adversarial action. LCB’s representation of defendants Cannizzaro and Clift is directly adverse to the Plaintiff senators in this action.”

October 24th motion by the Republican plaintiffs to disqualify LCB Legal as counsel for Senate Democrats

EDITORIAL: The dramatic link between freedom and prosperity

Las Vegas Review-Journal
November 10, 2019

If you want to increase a country’s wealth and life expectancy, while decreasing its infant mortality and poverty rates, make its people freer.

Those are some of the findings in the 2019 Economic Freedom of the World Report from the Fraser Institute, a Canadian think tank. It annually compares the level of freedom in countries across the globe in categories such as size of government, property rights and access to international trade. The United States ranked fifth, up from 16th in 2016. The freest countries in the world are Hong Kong, Singapore, New Zealand and Switzerland. The least-free countries are Sudan, Libya and, in last place, Venezuela.

Keystone’s Mission:

To recruit, support and advocate for candidates for public office who support private sector job creation, low taxation, a responsible regulatory environment, and effective delivery of essential state services.

Keystone’s Mission:

• To focus on candidate support on state legislative races and the governor’s office.
• To oppose any form of corporate income taxes or other business taxes that discourage capital investment and therefore job creation.
• Support limiting Nevada state government spending to the rate of population growth.

P.O. Box 93596 | Las Vegas, NV 89193-3596

To ensure that you continue receiving email updates,

please add Info@KeystoneNevada.com to your address book or safe list.
Click here to unsubscribe 
Having trouble viewing this e-mail? View it in your browser